Title

DIPG-67. Hypoxia-Inducible Factors Regulate Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Growth in Normoxic Culture

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Date

6-1-2018

Abstract

Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are incurable tumors and the leading cause of pediatric brain tumor deaths. They exhibit low blood perfusion and regions of necrosis, indicative of a low-oxygen environment that supports activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) that are associated with increased proliferation, invasion, and therapy resistance. However, previous reports suggest that HIF2-alpha slows growth in some glioma models. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that HIFs regulate DIPG growth. We cultured the human DIPG tumors SU-DIPG-IV, VUMC-DIPG-X, and SU-DIPG-XIII at ambient oxygen tension and 5% carbon dioxide. We measured protein expression by Western blot and growth by trypan blue exclusion or tetrazolium reduction following exposure to the hypoxia-mimetic (HM) compounds, cobalt (II) chloride or deferoxamine, or selective HIF inhibitors. All three DIPG cultures retained stable expression of HIF1-alpha and HIF2-alpha protein at ambient oxygen tension, unchanged by HM treatment. Selective inhibition of HIF2-alpha by TC-S 7009 increased apparent growth, whereas selective inhibition of HIF1-alpha by CAY10585 did not. We conclude that hypoxia-independent HIF expression unchanged by either HM treatment or HIF inhibition suggests impaired HIF degradation, in which hypoxia-induced activation of HIF target genes more likely depends on transcriptional co-activators rather than blocked proteasomal degradation. In both ambient and hypoxic conditions, HIF2-alpha activity may oppose DIPG growth. Future experiments will investigate whether the effects of HIF2-alpha inhibition on tumor growth can be explained by enhanced HIF1-alpha activity through desequestration of common binding partners, or through direct action of HIF2-alpha on previously reported apoptotic pathways.

Comments

International Society for Pediatric Neuro-Oncology. Denver, CO. July 1, 2018.

DOI

10.1093/neuonc/noy059.160


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