Publication Date

2020

Document Type

Dissertation

Committee Members

Noah Schroeder, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); Ann Farrell, Ph.D. (Committee Co-Chair); William Romine, Ph.D. (Committee Member); Brian Boyd, Ph.D. (Committee Member)

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Abstract

In this study, the investigator sought to determine the extent to which mathematics self-efficacy affects mathematics growth among students in grades four and five. Included in this investigation is a hypothesized structural model that reflects Bandura’s (1977a, 1986, 1989) theory of self-efficacy. In part one of the investigation, each variable in the model (mathematics self-efficacy, self-regulation in mathematics, mathematics avoidance, mathematics anxiety, attitude toward mathematics, and mathematics growth) was analyzed to determine whether there were significant differences between genders in those specified variables. Findings revealed gender differences in two of the six variables, self-regulation in mathematics and mathematics avoidance. Females reported more self-regulatory behaviors in mathematics and less mathematics avoidance behaviors. In part two of the study, the investigator examined the measurement and structural model. In addition, the direct and indirect effects of mathematics self-efficacy on mathematics growth were analyzed. Results from this investigation showed no significant direct effect of mathematics self-efficacy on mathematics growth. However, there was a significant indirect effect of mathematics self-efficacy on mathematics growth with the following mediating variables: self-regulation in mathematics, mathematics avoidance, mathematics anxiety, and attitude toward mathematics. The indirect effect of mathematics self-efficacy on mathematics growth was small, and 5% of the variance in mathematics growth could be explained by the predictor variables. Though some of the data supported Bandura’s (1977a, 1986, 1989) theory of self-efficacy, most of the findings do not support the theoretical framework. The findings from this investigation provide helpful information to the educators at the study’s site. Further intervention studies in the areas of mathematics self-efficacy, self-regulation in mathematics, mathematics avoidance, mathematics anxiety, and attitude toward mathematics are recommended. Another recommendation for the study’s site is to continue to strengthen the social and emotional learning environment with lessons centered on the growth mindset or through evidence-based programs.

Page Count

171

Year Degree Awarded

2020


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